Friday links

Here's your weekly serving of hypertext slurry:

Boba Fett Pantone

Flicking through the enormous and fantastic The Making of The Empire Strikes Back, I stumbled upon this little curio: Pantone references for Boba Fett's costume, provided by ILM for the licensing branch of Lucasfilm. Presumably similar guidelines were drawn up for other characters. What specific shade is Yoda? What are the colour refs for all of the lightsabers? Is the dark side coated or uncoated?

Alien: Covenant poster

Good crikey, just look at this poster for Alien: Covenant. I've actually been working on a little Alien-related personal project of my own recently, and just when I think I'm halfway happy with it … this appears. How am I supposed to compete with this? It's as if Rodin took the afternoon off and asked HR Giger to finish off The Gates of Hell in his absence. Stunning/infuriating.

Safe

"If you feel safe in the area you’re working in, you’re not working in the right area. Always go a little further into the water than you feel you’re capable of being in. Go a little bit out of your depth. And when you don’t feel that your feet are quite touching the bottom, you’re just about in the right place to do something exciting."

— David Bowie

Personal Shopper

Tula Lotay's poster for Olivier Assayas’ Personal Shopper is rather lovely, isn't it? Love that lettering. As if being a bit good with a pen wasn't enough, it turns out that Lotay is also the brains behind Thought Bubble (Leeds' excellent annual comic art festival) and creative director of splendid comic shop Travelling Man. Lord only knows when she finds time to sleep. Check out her shop for more of this sort of thing. 

Weirdos

This poster forBruce McDonald's Weirdos is quite something – a careful balance of boldness and restraint. It looks like it could be from the sixties, and yet it isn't some nostalgic rehash. In summary: wonderful. It's designed by Midnight Marauder, who currently owns film poster design and MUST BE STOPPED AT ALL COSTS. Seriously, check out the rest of his stuff, it's fab.

The art of Douglas Coupland

I've just noticed that Douglas Coupland has a new website. It might be new. It certainly looks new, and I don't remember it being there before, so … let's assume it's new. I'm a big fan of Coupland's writing – my faded pink edition of Generation X is never too far away – but I've only recently explored his art. It treads that big murky line between art and design; a blend of Mark Farrow, Peter Saville, Bill Drummond and Anthony Burrill. In summary: rather tasty.

Friday links

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This week's hypertext jamboree: 

Jack Coggins

Jack Coggins' space-age illustrations – particularly these from Rockets, Jets, Guided Missiles and Spaceships (1951) and By Spaceship to the Moon (1952) – depict the future from a very particular period, when the idea of manned space exploration was transitioning from pure fantasy to exciting possibility. And they're beautiful. Rather than fretting about pathetic little borders down here on Earth, maybe we should be embracing more of this kind of species-wide optimism and sense of adventure. Check out jackcoggins.info for more of Coggins' work.

Impressions of the Wilderness Children

So this happened. It came about because lovely copywriter chap Jon Ryder noticed some weird wording on a sign, and then equally lovely copywriter chap Jonny Cullen suggested it would make a good title for a horror movie (starring Jenny Agutter and Bernard Cribbins), and then original lovely copywriter chap Jon Ryder threw down the gauntlet for me to turn it into a cover (see twitter for the whole chain of events). I don't normally do covers on request like this, but this immediately struck me as a damn fine excuse to play with the Marber grid and pay homage to one of my all-time favourite Penguin covers, Penelope Mortimer's The Pumpkin Eater. Making up old-style paperback covers is a pretty futile exercise in nostalgism (I resisted artificially ageing it with the usual dog-ears and rips) but it's also rather fun.