Yuschav Arly

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Loving the playful geometric portraits of Indonesian artist Yuschav Arly. Brace yourself for a whole lot of teal. There’s something very appealing about constraining one’s work to a very particular palette – an approach common among a lot of my favourite artists and illustrators. 

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Coupland

I've just noticed that Douglas Coupland has a new website. It might be new. It certainly looks new, and I don't remember it being there before, so … let's assume it's new. I'm a big fan of Coupland's writing – my faded pink edition of Generation X is never too far away – but I've only recently explored his art. It treads that big murky line between art and design; a blend of Mark Farrow, Peter Saville, Bill Drummond and Anthony Burrill. In summary: rather tasty.

Simon Stalenhag

If you aren't already familiar with Simon Stalenhag's Scandi-scifi art, I suggest you get over to his site at once. He paints an ominous blend of the nightmarish and the calm, landscapes depicting the aftermath (or normalisation) of some horrifying techno-biological events. Often narratively linked, Stalenhag's work looks like concept art for the greatest film never made. It's surely only a matter of time before Hollywood comes calling – just imagine him paired up with Alex Garland, David Fincher or Denis Villeneuve.

Jack Coggins

Jack Coggins' space-age illustrations – particularly these from Rockets, Jets, Guided Missiles and Spaceships (1951) and By Spaceship to the Moon (1952) – depict the future from a very particular period, when the idea of manned space exploration was transitioning from pure fantasy to exciting possibility. And they're beautiful. Rather than fretting about pathetic little borders down here on Earth, maybe we should be embracing more of this kind of species-wide optimism and sense of adventure. Check out jackcoggins.info for more of Coggins' work.