Henry Miller's Eleven Commandments

  1. Work on one thing at a time until finished.
  2. Start no more new books, add no more new material to "Black Spring".
  3. Don't be nervous. Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.
  4. Work according to Program and not according to mood. Stop at the appointed time!
  5. When you can't create you can work.
  6. Cement a little every day, rather than add new fertilizers.
  7. Keep human! See people, go places, drink if you feel like it.
  8. Don't be a draught-horse! Work with pleasure only.
  9. Discard the Program when you feel like it—but go back to it next day. ConcentrateNarrow downExclude.
  10. Forget the books you want to write. Think only of the book you are writing.
  11. Write first and always. Painting, music, friends, cinema, all these come afterwards.

Boyhood reading list

Boyhood is quite unlike any film I've ever seen. If you've seen it, you're no doubt a little bit obsessed and want to know more about it. A good place to start is with the Boyhood FAQ, but it's also well worth having a dig through this lot:

Robinson Crusoe etc.

I've only just discovered that the full title of Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe is:

The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, Of York, Mariner: Who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an un-inhabited Island on the Coast of America, near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, wherein all the Men perished but himself. With An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver'd by Pyrates.

Books just don't have interesting, ludicrously detailed titles any more, do they? Tis a shame. Anyway, nice to see York get a mention in there.

And so to work on a new cover …

 

Hayao Miyazaki on the curse of creative regret

From Hayao Miyazaki's Turning Point 1997–2008:

Making films is all about — as soon as you’re finished — continually regretting what you’ve done. When we look at films we’ve made, all we can see are the flaws; we can’t even watch them in a normal way. I never feel like watching my own films again. So unless I start working on a new one, I’ll never be free from the curse of the last one. I’m serious. Unless I start working on the next film, the last one will be a drag on me for another two or three years.

And with that, Miyazaki succinctly describes the ongoing state of mind and primary motivation of every creative person I know. Forever on a loop of perfection, disappointment and determination. 

Grand Budapest Hotel reading list

Going through my latest collection of reading material stashed away in Pocket, I notice I have rather a lot of stuff related to The Grand Budapest Hotel. So I thought I'd share: