Dune

It was announced today that Denis Villeneuve (Sicario, Arrival, Blade Runner 2049) has signed up to direct the new adaptation of Frank Herbert’s science fiction epic Dune. As good excuse as any to revisit the incredible concept art for Alejandro Jodorowsky's aborted 1970s version, by the likes of Jean “Moebius” Giraud, HR “NSFW” Giger and Chris “say, what do you reckon Rod Stewart would look like if he was a spaceship?” Foss. It's a shame none of this made its way onto the big screen (aside from Giger’s design for Harkonnen Castle, which appeared in Prometheus for some reason), so it'll be interesting to see if Villeneuve draws upon any of it for his new version, of if a similarly strong pedigree of contemporary concept artists can be corralled. 

Half-dissected Ralph Wiggum anatomical model cake

Look, it's a half-dissected Ralph Wiggum anatomical model cake! You probably didn't know that you needed a half-dissected Ralph Wiggum anatomical model cake in your life, but yes, you do in fact need a half-dissected Ralph Wiggum anatomical model cake in your life. Fantastic culinary design by Letterpress Bakery.

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Artists’ artefacts by Nicholas Calcott

To promote this year’s Frieze New York art fair, photographer Nicholas Calcott has shot artefacts from the studios of various legendary New York artists – including Robert Rauschenberg, Keith Haring and Jackson Pollock. Selected and arranged together details, the items form portraits of each artist; battered tools, notes and ephemera offer the briefest of glimpses behind the curtain. I'm particularly drawn to Josef Albers’ Pantone guide – I bet that seems some thumbing in its time.

Materials from Robert Rauschenberg’s home and studio.

Materials from Robert Rauschenberg’s home and studio.

Artefacts from Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner’s home and studio, East Hampton, NY.

Artefacts from Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner’s home and studio, East Hampton, NY.

Artefacts from Isamu Noguchi’s studio, Long Island City, NY.

Artefacts from Isamu Noguchi’s studio, Long Island City, NY.

Artifacts from Donald Judd’s home and studio, 101 Spring Street, New York, NY.

Artifacts from Donald Judd’s home and studio, 101 Spring Street, New York, NY.

Items from the Calder Foundation archives.

Items from the Calder Foundation archives.

Objects from Keith Haring’s studio, New York, NY.

Objects from Keith Haring’s studio, New York, NY.

Artifacts from The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation.

Artifacts from The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation.

Helen Frankenthaler’s studio and archival materials.

Helen Frankenthaler’s studio and archival materials.

Snowflakes by Alexay Kljatov

With little more than bunch of taped-together macro lenses and some black wool, Alexay Kljatov shoots photographs of snowflakes (or rather, snow crystals) on his balcony at home. The results are simply stunning. Anyone who thinks that “snowflake” is a derogatory term clearly has no understanding of beauty or science or language or wonder or anything. Snowflakes are incredible. Look at them. 

David Bowie’s Heathen

What with all the coverage The Next Day and have received over the last couple of years, it’s well worth revisiting the design of Heathen, Jonathan Barnbrook's first collaboration with Bowie (and photographer Markus Klinko). Between those three albums, there’s an interesting thread of distorted type and obscured portraiture – Barnbrook hides Bowie's eyes with pearly eeriness, bandages or a bloody great big white square. With Heathen, his rampage is out of control; scratching out the eyes of Carlo Dolci’s Maria Maddalena and Raffaello Sanzio’s St Sebastian among others. The whole thing oozes wickedness.

Also, it’s a cracking album.

Heathen, 2002.

Michael Johansson

Swedish artist Michael Johansson creates wonderful sculptural installations by – please stop me if I'm going too fast for you here – arranging stuff into shapes. Okay, there's probably more to it than that. There's something exceedingly satisfying about the way he seamlessly piles a bunch of unrelated things into a doorway just so, suggesting unlikely relationships between object and architecture. May the world forever be his Tetris.

Chris Ware on the New Yorker

Over the last ten years, Chris Ware has been capturing the shifting values, worries and conventions of 21st century parenthood on his covers for The New Yorker. From the playground full of fathers to the ubiquitous glowing screen of the always-online parent, these scenes will be all-too familiar to any parent. Here are some of the best.

Dead Bookstore

Ben Pieratt's new project – Dead Bookstore – is such an exceedingly simple and elegant idea, it seems odd that it hasn't been done before. Basically, he breaks signature-bound books down into individual sheets and looks for interesting unintentional compositions that can be framed as art. Images that would've been pages apart in the book now lay side-by-side, contrasting and interrupting each other. The results are quite beautiful – I may start plundering charity shops for potential cadavers to disassemble. 

Feathered dinosaurs by John Conway

Hollywood may be lagging behind on this, but it's becoming increasingly apparent that dinosaurs were a lot more like birds than we previously thought. Recent discoveries suggest that many of them were in fact feathered (this article from Living Bird tells you everything you need to know); it's unlikely they were the big scaly lizards you grew up with. John Conway is one of several illustrators playing catch up with this paleontological revelation, revising our idea of what dinosaurs may have looked like. It's incredible what a difference this detail makes to our perception of dinosaurs and birds – the image of a velociraptor preening its feathers is particularly striking. Time for a CGI-corrected version of Jurassic Park perhaps?

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